ABOUT ME

MY PROJECTS

As far as I remember myself, I have always been immersed in cross-cultural encounters. In my dissertation, titled “Cross-cultural Encounters in Israeli-Korean Technological Collaborations,” I examine how Israeli and Korean managers define their own and others’ culture in relation to what is considered to be West or East, developed or developing economies, and innovation or imitation. More specifically, the dissertation deals with resource complementarity between Israeli innovation and Korean productivity, the meaning of cultural similarity in cross-cultural management, and the role of industrial espionage discourse in re-branding South Korea as a leader in technological innovation. 

 

Apart from my dissertation and reflective of my broad interest in cross-cultural interactions, since 2012 I have worked on the theme of international fandom of Korean popular culture. Together with a team of colleagues from both the social sciences and humanities, I have co-authored six papers on cultural images of Korea among fans from Israel, Palestine, and other Middle Eastern countries. More specifically, this research project explores 

how fans imagine Korea through TV dramas as a symbolic pilgrimage, how they turn their fandom into Korea-related business, and how they associate "minority solidarity" with "Korea" as a tool of empowerment among social minorities.

My next research project extends the investigation of industrial espionage, building on the case of the Apple vs. Samsung “smartphone patent wars.” I propose to examine the Apple vs. Samsung case not only as a legal dispute, but as a battle over legitimacy. With a focus on MNCs from former developing economies, such as South Korea, associated with a technological “catching-up” and imitation stigma, this project aims to illuminate the role of the national and corporate reputation. While former developing economies have closed economic gaps with developed economies, we still need to investigate their and their MNCs’ struggle for reputation of being (rather than becoming) innovative and developed.

Despite the outstanding economic success associated with the flow of quality electronic goods, Korean development continues to be seen as entangled in the evolutionary process of “still works-in-progress”. Korea's meteoric rise in the 1980s from a mostly agricultural and technologically backward nation to 12th-largest economy in the world, is often associated with its celebrated conglomerates’ engagement in catching-up practices—imitating and improving overseas technology, products, knowledge, and policies. The extensive media coverage of accusations made against Korea for its involvement in technological imitation—including the Apple Inc. vs. Samsung Electronics intellectual property lawsuit—has further served to stigmatize Korea and its major business players as technological copycats.          

 

KOREAN CULTURAL MIRACLE

2011-2017

MA in Organization Studies, Sociology and Anthropology, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem

KOREAN ECONOMIC MIRACLE

RESEARCH INTERESTS

EDUCATION

POSTCOLONIAL IMAGINATION, IMAGERY and IMAGES

2007-2010

MA in Organization Studies, Sociology and Anthropology, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem

2002-2006

BA in Sociology and Anthropology and English Literature, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem

CRITICAL MANAGEMENT STUDIES

INDUSTRIAL ESPIONAGE

FANDOM STUDIES

The Science & 

Mathematics University

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