ABOUT ME

As far as I remember myself, I have always been immersed in cross-cultural encounters. In my dissertation, titled “Cross-cultural Encounters in Israeli-Korean Technological Collaborations,” I examine how Israeli and Korean managers define their own and others’ culture in relation to what is considered to be West or East, developed or developing economies, and innovation or imitation. I have so far published one paper on cross-cultural training and the use of cultural stereotypes, and I am currently working on three additional papers based on the dissertation. These papers deal with resource complementarity between Israeli innovation and Korean productivity, the meaning of cultural similarity in cross-cultural management, and the role of industrial espionage discourse in rebranding South Korea as a leader in technological innovation. 

 

Apart from my dissertation and reflective of my broad interest in cross-cultural interactions, I have also worked since 2012 on the theme of international fandom of Korean popular culture. Together with a team of colleagues from both the social sciences and humanities, I have published five papers on cultural images of Korea among fans from Israel, Palestine, and other Middle Eastern countries. 

MY PROJECTS

My research project for 2017/2018 year, titled “Academy Goes East,” expands my inquiry into cross-cultural encounters. This project grew out of my four-year experience as an academic advisor to the joint Business Administration and Asian Studies Program at the Hebrew University. Employing ethnographic research, this study will trace the expansion of Israeli education markets toward the East by examining the Hebrew University’s Executive Innovation and Entrepreneurship Program which, in 2017 alone, hosted more than 40 delegations from China.

My research project for 2018/2019 year extends the investigation of industrial espionage, building on the case of the Apple vs. Samsung “smartphone patent wars.” I propose to examine the Apple vs. Samsung case not only as a legal dispute, but as a battle over legitimacy. With a focus on MNCs from former developing economies, such as South Korea, associated with a technological “catching-up” and imitation stigma, this project aims to illuminate the role of the national and corporate reputation. While former developing economies have closed economic gaps with developed economies, we still need to investigate their and their MNCs’ struggle for reputation of being (rather than becoming) innovative and developed.

2007 - 2010

MA in Organization Studies, Sociology and Anthropology, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem

INDUSTRIAL ESPIONAGE

INTERNALIZATION OF HIGHER EDUCATION

2002 - 2006

BA in Sociology and Anthropology and English Literature, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem

CRITICAL MANAGEMENT STUDIES

2011 - 2017

PhD in Organization Studies, Sociology and Anthropology, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem

NATION BRANDING

RESEARCH INTERESTS

EDUCATION

KOREAN POPULAR CULTURE

CRITICAL MANAGEMENT STUDIES

The Science & 

Mathematics University

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